PRELIMINARY PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION PATTERN OF Acacia nilotica (L.) DELILE (ANGIOSPERMS; FABACEAE)

Main Article Content

RASHMI CHANDRA
AFROZ ALAM

Abstract

Ancient civilizations were mostly relied on the natural flora and fauna for fulfillment of their basic needs such as food, shelter, clothing, transportation and the medicines. According to the WHO, approximately 21,000 plants were used for medicinal purpose across the world. Among the well-known medicinal plants, Acacia nilotica (L.) Delile (family Fabaceae) is an imperative medicinal plant of subtropical and tropical regions, locally called Babul/Kikar in India. The different plant parts secrete different phytochemicals constituent and theses constituents used to treat various diseases. This study was performed to provide the information concerning phytochemical and crystalline properties of this important medicinal plant. These findings would be helpful to use this plant more as natural source for development of novel herbal drugs to cure many diseases.

Keywords:
Acacia nilotica, biological activity, crystalline properties, medicinal plant, phytochemicals

Article Details

How to Cite
CHANDRA, R., & ALAM, A. (2021). PRELIMINARY PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION PATTERN OF Acacia nilotica (L.) DELILE (ANGIOSPERMS; FABACEAE). PLANT CELL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, 22(29-30), 20-25. Retrieved from https://ikpresse.com/index.php/PCBMB/article/view/6199
Section
Short Research Article

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